Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI Zero Windows 10 IoT Core

During the week a package arrived from Seeedstudio with a Grove Base Hat for RPI Zero. So I have modified my Grove Base Hat for RPI Windows 10 IoT Core library to add support for the new shield.

Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI Zero on Raspberry PI 3

The Raspberry PI Zero hat has a two less analog ports and a different device id so some conditional compile options were necessary

namespace devMobile.Windows10IoTCore.GroveBaseHatRPI
{
#if (!GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI && !GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI_ZERO)
#error Library must have at least one of GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI or GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI_ZERO defined
#endif

#if (GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI && GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI_ZERO)
#error Library must have at most one of GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI or GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI_ZERO defined
#endif

	public class AnalogPorts : IDisposable
	{
		private const int I2CAddress = 0x04;
		private const byte RegisterDeviceId = 0x0;
		private const byte RegisterVersion = 0x02;
		private const byte RegisterPowerSupplyVoltage = 0x29;
		private const byte RegisterRawBase = 0x10;
		private const byte RegisterVoltageBase = 0x20;
		private const byte RegisterValueBase = 0x30;
#if GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI
		private const byte DeviceId = 0x0004;
#endif
#if GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI_ZERO
		private const byte DeviceId = 0x0005;
#endif
		private I2cDevice Device= null;
		private bool Disposed = false;

		public enum AnalogPort
		{
			A0 = 0,
			A1 = 1,
			A2 = 2,
			A3 = 3,
			A4 = 4,
			A5 = 5,
#if GROVE_BASE_HAT_RPI
			A6 = 6,
			A7 = 7,
#endif
		};

The code updates have been “smoke” tested and I have updated the GitHub repository.

Fez Lemur & Panda III AnalogInput read rates

I had previously have measured the AnalogInput read rate of my Netduino devices and was surprised by some of the numbers. Now, I have another project in the planning phase which will be using a GHI Electronics Fez Lemur or Fez Panda III device and had time for a quick test.

This is just a simple test, not terribly representative of real world just to get comparable numbers.

public static void Main()
{
   int value;
   AnalogInput x1 = new AnalogInput(FEZLemur.AnalogInput.A0);
   Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

   Debug.Print("Starting");

   stopwatch.Start();
   for (int i = 0; i < SampleCount; i++)
   {
      value = x1.ReadRaw();
   }
   stopwatch.Stop();

   Debug.Print("Duration = " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " mSec " + (SampleCount * 1000 / stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds).ToString() + "/sec");
}

Fez Lemur 84 MHz CPU
Duration = 2855 mSec 35026/sec
Duration = 2854 mSec 35038/sec
Duration = 2854 mSec 35038/sec
Duration = 2854 mSec 35038/sec
Duration = 2861 mSec 34952/sec

Duration = 2856 mSec 35014/sec
Duration = 2854 mSec 35038/sec
Duration = 2855 mSec 35026/sec
Duration = 2854 mSec 35038/sec
Duration = 2854 mSec 35038/sec

Fez Panda III 180MHz CPU
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec

Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec
Duration = 1799 mSec 55586/sec

It looks like the GHI Team have a performant implementation of AnalogInput.ReadRaw()