Grove – Carbon Dioxide Sensor(MH-Z16) trial

In preparation for a student project to monitor the CO2 levels in a number of classrooms I purchased a Grove – Carbon Dioxide Sensor(MH-Z16) for evaluation.


Arduino Uno R3 and CO2 Sensor

I downloaded the seeedstudio wiki example code, compiled and uploaded it to one of my Arduino Uno R3 devices.

I increased delay between readings to 10sec and reduced the baud rate of the serial logging to 9600baud.

/*
  This test code is write for Arduino AVR Series(UNO, Leonardo, Mega)
  If you want to use with LinkIt ONE, please connect the module to D0/1 and modify:

  // #include <SoftwareSerial.h>
  // SoftwareSerial s_serial(2, 3);      // TX, RX

  #define sensor Serial1
*/


#include <SoftwareSerial.h>
SoftwareSerial s_serial(2, 3);      // TX, RX

#define sensor s_serial

const unsigned char cmd_get_sensor[] =
{
    0xff, 0x01, 0x86, 0x00, 0x00,
    0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x79
};

unsigned char dataRevice[9];
int temperature;
int CO2PPM;

void setup()
{
    sensor.begin(9600);
    Serial.begin(9600);
    Serial.println("get a 'g', begin to read from sensor!");
    Serial.println("********************************************************");
    Serial.println();
}

void loop()
{
    if(dataRecieve())
    {
        Serial.print("Temperature: ");
        Serial.print(temperature);
        Serial.print("  CO2: ");
        Serial.print(CO2PPM);
        Serial.println("");
    }
    delay(10000);
}

bool dataRecieve(void)
{
    byte data[9];
    int i = 0;

    //transmit command data
    for(i=0; i<sizeof(cmd_get_sensor); i++)
    {
        sensor.write(cmd_get_sensor[i]);
    }
    delay(10);
    //begin reveiceing data
    if(sensor.available())
    {
        while(sensor.available())
        {
            for(int i=0;i<9; i++)
            {
                data[i] = sensor.read();
            }
        }
    }

    for(int j=0; j<9; j++)
    {
        Serial.print(data[j]);
        Serial.print(" ");
    }
    Serial.println("");

    if((i != 9) || (1 + (0xFF ^ (byte)(data[1] + data[2] + data[3] + data[4] + data[5] + data[6] + data[7]))) != data[8])
    {
        return false;
    }

    CO2PPM = (int)data[2] * 256 + (int)data[3];
    temperature = (int)data[4] - 40;

    return true;
}

The debug output wasn’t too promising there weren’t any C02 parts per million (ppm) values and the response payloads looked wrong. So I downloaded the MH-Z16 NDIR CO2 Sensor datasheet for some background. The datasheet didn’t mention any temperature data in the message payloads so I removed that code.

The response payload validation code was all on one line and hard to figure out what it was doing.

    if((i != 9) || (1 + (0xFF ^ (byte)(data[1] + data[2] + data[3] + data[4] + data[5] + data[6] + data[7]))) != data[8])
    {
        return false;
    }

To make debugging easier I split the payload validation code into several steps so I could see what was failing.

/*
  This test code is write for Arduino AVR Series(UNO, Leonardo, Mega)
  If you want to use with LinkIt ONE, please connect the module to D0/1 and modify:

  // #include <SoftwareSerial.h>
  // SoftwareSerial s_serial(2, 3);      // TX, RX

  #define sensor Serial1
*/


#include <SoftwareSerial.h>
SoftwareSerial s_serial(2, 3);      // TX, RX

#define sensor s_serial

const unsigned char cmd_get_sensor[] =
{
    0xff, 0x01, 0x86, 0x00, 0x00,
    0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x79
};

unsigned char dataRevice[9];
int CO2PPM;

void setup()
{
    sensor.begin(9600);
    Serial.begin(9600);
    Serial.println("get a 'g', begin to read from sensor!");
    Serial.println("********************************************************");
    Serial.println();
}

void loop()
{
    if(dataRecieve())
    {
        Serial.print("  CO2: ");
        Serial.print(CO2PPM);
        Serial.println("");
    }
    delay(10000);
}

bool dataRecieve(void)
{
    byte data[9];
    int i = 0;

    //transmit command data
    for(i=0; i<sizeof(cmd_get_sensor); i++)
    {
        sensor.write(cmd_get_sensor[i]);
    }
    delay(10);
    //begin reveiceing data
    if(sensor.available())
    {
        while(sensor.available())
        {
            for(int i=0;i<9; i++)
            {
                data[i] = sensor.read();
            }
        }
    }

    for(int j=0; j<9; j++)
    {
        Serial.print(data[j]);
        Serial.print(" ");
    }
    Serial.println("");

    // First calculate then validate the check sum as there is no point in proceeding if the packet is corrupted. (code inspired by datasheet algorithm)
    byte checksum = 0 ;
    for(int j=1; j<8; j++)
    {
      checksum += data[j];
    }
    checksum=0xff-checksum; 
    checksum+=1;
       
    if  (checksum != data[8])
    {
      Serial.println("Error checksum");
      return false;
    }

    // Then check the start byte to make sure response is what we were expecting
    if ( data[0] != 0xFF )
    {
        Serial.println("Error start byte");
        return false;
    }

    // Then check the command byte to make sure response is what we were expecting
    if ( data[1] != 0x86 )
    {
        Serial.println("Error command");
        return false;
    }


    CO2PPM = (int)data[2] * 256 + (int)data[3];

    return true;
}

From these modifications I could see the payload was messed up and based on the datasheet message descriptions it looked like it was offset by a byte or two.

15:58:32.509 -> get a 'g', begin to read from sensor!
15:58:32.578 -> ********************************************************
15:58:32.612 -> 
15:58:32.612 -> 255 134 6 238 76 0 0 1 255 
15:58:32.647 -> Error checksum
15:58:42.631 -> 57 255 134 6 246 76 0 0 1 
15:58:42.666 -> Error checksum
15:58:52.667 -> 49 255 134 5 125 76 0 0 1 
15:58:52.702 -> Error checksum
15:59:02.704 -> 171 255 134 4 86 76 0 0 1 
15:59:02.750 -> Error checksum

I had a look at the code and the delay(10) after sending the sensor reading request message caught my attention. I have found that often delay(x) commands are used to “tweak” the code to get it to work.

These “tweaks” often break when code is run on a different device or sensor firmware is updated changing the timing of individual bytes, or request-response processes.

I removed the delay(10) replaced it with a serial.flush() and changed the code to display the payload bytes in hexadecimal.

/*
  This test code is write for Arduino AVR Series(UNO, Leonardo, Mega)
  If you want to use with LinkIt ONE, please connect the module to D0/1 and modify:

  // #include <SoftwareSerial.h>
  // SoftwareSerial s_serial(2, 3);      // TX, RX

  #define sensor Serial1
*/


#include <SoftwareSerial.h>
SoftwareSerial s_serial(2, 3);      // TX, RX

#define sensor s_serial

const unsigned char cmd_get_sensor[] =
{
    0xff, 0x01, 0x86, 0x00, 0x00,
    0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x79
};

unsigned char dataRevice[9];
int CO2PPM;

void setup()
{
    sensor.begin(9600);
    Serial.begin(9600);
    Serial.println("get a 'g', begin to read from sensor!");
    Serial.println("********************************************************");
    Serial.println();
}

void loop()
{
    if(dataRecieve())
    {
        Serial.print("  CO2: ");
        Serial.print(CO2PPM);
        Serial.println("");
    }
    delay(10000);
}

bool dataRecieve(void)
{
    byte data[9];
    int i = 0;

    //transmit command data
    for(i=0; i<sizeof(cmd_get_sensor); i++)
    {
        sensor.write(cmd_get_sensor[i]);
    }
    Serial.flush();
    
    //begin reveiceing data
    if(sensor.available())
    {
        while(sensor.available())
        {
            for(int i=0;i<9; i++)
            {
                data[i] = sensor.read();
            }
        }
    }

    for(int j=0; j<9; j++)
    {
        Serial.print(data[j],HEX);
        Serial.print(" ");
    }
    Serial.println("");

    // First calculate then validate the check sum as there is no point in proceeding if the packet is corrupted. (code inspired by datasheet algorithm)
    byte checksum = 0 ;
    for(int j=1; j<8; j++)
    {
      checksum += data[j];
    }
    checksum=0xff-checksum; 
    checksum+=1;
       
    if  (checksum != data[8])
    {
      Serial.println("Error checksum");
      return false;
    }

    // Then check the start byte to make sure response is what we were expecting
    if ( data[0] != 0xFF )
    {
        Serial.println("Error start byte");
        return false;
    }

    // Then check the command byte to make sure response is what we were expecting
    if ( data[1] != 0x86 )
    {
        Serial.println("Error command");
        return false;
    }


    CO2PPM = (int)data[2] * 256 + (int)data[3];

    return true;
}

The initial values from the sensor were a bit high, but after leaving the device running for 3 minutes (Preheat time in the documentation) they settled down into a reasonable range

16:14:31.686 -> get a 'g', begin to read from sensor!
16:14:31.721 -> ********************************************************
16:14:31.789 -> 
16:14:31.789 -> 255 134 6 224 75 0 0 1 72 
16:14:31.823 ->   CO2: 1760
16:14:41.824 -> 255 134 6 224 75 0 0 1 72 
16:14:41.824 ->   CO2: 1760
16:14:51.824 -> 255 134 5 189 75 0 0 1 108 
16:14:51.858 ->   CO2: 1469
16:15:01.868 -> 255 134 3 157 75 0 0 1 142 
16:15:01.868 ->   CO2: 925
16:15:11.857 -> 255 134 3 223 75 0 0 1 76 
16:15:11.892 ->   CO2: 991
16:15:21.882 -> 255 134 6 56 75 0 0 1 240 
16:15:21.917 ->   CO2: 1592
16:15:31.911 -> 255 134 4 186 75 0 0 1 112 
16:15:31.945 ->   CO2: 1210
16:15:41.927 -> 255 134 3 131 75 0 0 1 168 
16:15:41.962 ->   CO2: 899
16:15:51.940 -> 255 134 3 30 75 0 0 1 13 
16:15:51.975 ->   CO2: 798
16:16:01.986 -> 255 134 2 201 75 0 0 1 99 
16:16:01.986 ->   CO2: 713
16:16:11.985 -> 255 134 4 133 75 0 0 1 165 
16:16:12.019 ->   CO2: 1157
16:16:22.020 -> 255 134 6 62 75 0 0 1 234 
16:16:22.053 ->   CO2: 1598
16:16:32.041 -> 255 134 5 80 75 0 0 1 217 
16:16:32.041 ->   CO2: 1360
16:16:42.057 -> 255 134 3 204 75 0 0 1 95 
16:16:42.092 ->   CO2: 972
16:16:52.084 -> 255 134 3 191 75 0 0 1 108 
16:16:52.084 ->   CO2: 959
16:17:02.102 -> 255 134 2 230 75 0 0 1 70 
16:17:02.102 ->   CO2: 742
16:17:12.094 -> 255 134 3 106 75 0 0 1 193 
16:17:12.129 ->   CO2: 874
16:17:22.111 -> 255 134 2 227 75 0 0 1 73 
16:17:22.145 ->   CO2: 739
16:17:32.139 -> 255 134 3 225 75 0 0 1 74 
16:17:32.172 ->   CO2: 993
16:17:42.170 -> 255 134 3 109 75 0 0 1 190 
16:17:42.204 ->   CO2: 877
16:17:52.174 -> 255 134 2 188 75 0 0 1 112 
16:17:52.207 ->   CO2: 700
16:18:02.218 -> 255 134 2 70 75 0 0 1 230 
16:18:02.253 ->   CO2: 582
16:18:12.239 -> 255 134 2 163 75 0 0 1 137 
16:18:12.239 ->   CO2: 675
16:18:22.251 -> 255 134 2 110 75 0 0 1 190 
16:18:22.285 ->   CO2: 622
16:18:32.246 -> 255 134 2 83 75 0 0 1 217 
16:18:32.280 ->   CO2: 595
16:18:42.277 -> 255 134 2 48 75 0 0 1 252 
16:18:42.312 ->   CO2: 560
16:18:52.305 -> 255 134 2 62 75 0 0 1 238 
16:18:52.339 ->   CO2: 574

Bill of materials (prices as at Jan 2019)

After these tentative fixes for the MH-Z16 sensor I think going to see if there are any other libraries written by someone smarter than me available.

Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI Windows 10 IoT Core

After some experimentation I have a proof of concept Windows 10 IoT Core library for accessing the Analog to Digital Convertor (ADC) on a Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI.

I can read the raw, voltage & % values just fine but the Version number isn’t quite what I expected. In the python sample code I can see the register numbers etc.

def __init__(self, address=0x04):
self.address = address
self.bus = grove.i2c.Bus()

def read_raw(self, channel):
addr = 0x10 + channel
return self.read_register(addr)

# read input voltage (mV)
def read_voltage(self, channel):
addr = 0x20 + channel
return self.read_register(addr)

# input voltage / output voltage (%)
def read(self, channel):
addr = 0x30 + channel
return self.read_register(addr)

@property
def name(self):
id = self.read_register(0x0)
if id == RPI_HAT_PID:
return RPI_HAT_NAME
elif id == RPI_ZERO_HAT_PID:
return RPI_ZERO_HAT_NAME

@property
def version(self):
return self.read_register(0x3)

When I read register 0x3 to get the version info the value changes randomly. Format = register num, byte value, word value

0,4,4 1,134,10374 2,2,2 3,82,79 4,0,0 5,0,0 6,0,0 7,0,0 8,0,0 9,0,0 10,0,0 11,0,0 12,0,0 13,0,0 14,0,0 15,0,0 
0,4,4 1,134,10374 2,2,2 3,86,69 4,0,0 5,0,0 6,0,0 7,0,0 8,0,0 9,0,0 10,0,0 11,0,0 12,0,0 13,0,0 14,0,0 15,0,0 
0,4,4 1,134,10374 2,2,2 3,32,66 4,0,0 5,0,0 6,0,0 7,0,0 8,0,0 9,0,0 10,0,0 11,0,0 12,0,0 13,0,0 14,0,0 15,0,0 

It looks like register 1 or 2 (134/10374 or 2/2) might contain the device version information.

The code is available on GitHub here. Next time I purchase some gear from Seeedstudio I’ll include a Grove Base Hat For Raspberry PI Zero and extend the software so they work as well.

public sealed class StartupTask : IBackgroundTask
{
   private ThreadPoolTimer timer;
   private BackgroundTaskDeferral deferral;
   AnalogPorts analogPorts = new AnalogPorts();

   public void Run(IBackgroundTaskInstance taskInstance)
   {
      deferral = taskInstance.GetDeferral();

      analogPorts.Initialise();

      byte version = analogPorts.Version();
      Debug.WriteLine($"Version {version}");

      double powerSupplyVoltage = analogPorts.PowerSupplyVoltage();
      Debug.WriteLine($"Power supply voltage {powerSupplyVoltage}v");

      timer = ThreadPoolTimer.CreatePeriodicTimer(AnalogPorts, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
   }

   void AnalogPorts(ThreadPoolTimer timer)
   {
      try
      {
         ushort valueRaw;
         valueRaw = analogPorts.ReadRaw(AnalogPorts.AnalogPort.A0);
         Debug.WriteLine($"A0 Raw {valueRaw}");

         double valueVoltage;
         valueVoltage = analogPorts.ReadVoltage(AnalogPorts.AnalogPort.A0);
         Debug.WriteLine($"A0 {valueVoltage}v");

         double value;
         value = analogPorts.Read(AnalogPorts.AnalogPort.A0);
         Debug.WriteLine($"A0 {value}");
      }
      catch (Exception ex)
      {
         Debug.WriteLine($"AnalogPorts Read failed {ex.Message}");
      }
   }
}

Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI Investigation

For a couple of projects I had been using the Dexter industries GrovePI+ and the Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI looked like a cheaper alternative for many applications, but it lacked Windows 10 IoT Core support.

My first project was to build a Inter Integrated Circuit(I2C) device scanner to check that the Grove Base Hat STM32 MCU I2C client implementation on a “played nice” with Windows 10 IoT core.

My Visual Studio 2017 project (I2C Device Scanner) scans all the valid 7bit I2C addresses and in the debug output displayed the two “found” devices, a Grove- 3 Axis Accelerometer(+-16G) (ADXL345) and the Grove Base Hat for Raspberry PI.

backgroundTaskHost.exe' (CoreCLR: CoreCLR_UWP_Domain): Loaded 'C:\Data\Users\DefaultAccount\AppData\Local\DevelopmentFiles\I2CDeviceScanner-uwpVS.Debug_ARM.Bryn.Lewis\System.Diagnostics.Debug.dll'. Skipped loading symbols. Module is optimized and the debugger option 'Just My Code' is enabled.

'backgroundTaskHost.exe' (CoreCLR: CoreCLR_UWP_Domain): Loaded 'C:\Data\Users\DefaultAccount\AppData\Local\DevelopmentFiles\I2CDeviceScanner-uwpVS.Debug_ARM.Bryn.Lewis\System.Linq.dll'. Skipped loading symbols. Module is optimized and the debugger option 'Just My Code' is enabled.
Exception thrown: 'System.IO.FileNotFoundException' in devMobile.Windows10IoTCore.I2CDeviceScanner.winmd
WinRT information: Slave address was not acknowledged.
.......
Exception thrown: 'System.IO.FileNotFoundException' in devMobile.Windows10IoTCore.I2CDeviceScanner.winmd
WinRT information: Slave address was not acknowledged.

I2C Controller \\?\ACPI#MSFT8000#1#{a11ee3c6-8421-4202-a3e7-b91ff90188e4}\I2C1 has 2 devices
Address 0x4
Address 0x53
Raspberry PI with Grove Base Hat & ADXL345 & Rotary angle sensor
Raspberry PI with Grove Base Hat I2C test rig

The next step was to confirm I could read the device ID of the ADXL345 and the Grove Base Hat for RaspberryPI. I had to figure out the Grove Base Hat for RaspberryPI from the Seeedstudio Python code.

I2CDevicePinger ADXL345 Debug output

...
'backgroundTaskHost.exe' (CoreCLR: CoreCLR_UWP_Domain): Loaded 'C:\Data\Users\DefaultAccount\AppData\Local\DevelopmentFiles\I2CDevicePinger-uwpVS.Debug_ARM.Bryn.Lewis\System.Diagnostics.Debug.dll'. Skipped loading symbols. Module is optimized and the debugger option 'Just My Code' is enabled.
DeviceID 0XE5

The DeviceID for the ADXL345 matched the DEVID in the device datasheet.

I2CDevicePinger Debug output

'backgroundTaskHost.exe' (CoreCLR: CoreCLR_UWP_Domain): Loaded 'C:\Data\Users\DefaultAccount\AppData\Local\DevelopmentFiles\I2CDevicePinger-uwpVS.Debug_ARM.Bryn.Lewis\System.Diagnostics.Debug.dll'. Skipped loading symbols. Module is optimized and the debugger option 'Just My Code' is enabled.
DeviceID 0X4

The DeviceID for the Grove Base Hat for RaspberryPI matched

RPI_HAT_PID = 0x0004 in the Python code.

The last test application reads the raw value of the specified analog input

public async void Run(IBackgroundTaskInstance taskInstance)
{
   string aqs = I2cDevice.GetDeviceSelector();
   DeviceInformationCollection I2CBusControllers = await DeviceInformation.FindAllAsync(aqs);

   if (I2CBusControllers.Count != 1)
   {
      Debug.WriteLine("Unexpect number of I2C bus controllers found");
      return;
   }

   I2cConnectionSettings settings = new I2cConnectionSettings(0x04)
   {
      BusSpeed = I2cBusSpeed.StandardMode,
      SharingMode = I2cSharingMode.Shared,
   };

   using (I2cDevice device = I2cDevice.FromIdAsync(I2CBusControllers[0].Id, settings).AsTask().GetAwaiter().GetResult())
   {
      try
      {
         ushort value = 0;
         // From the Seeedstudio python
	 // 0x10 ~ 0x17: ADC raw data
	 // 0x20 ~ 0x27: input voltage
         // 0x29: output voltage (Grove power supply voltage)
         // 0x30 ~ 0x37: input voltage / output voltage						
         do
	 {
            byte[] writeBuffer = new byte[1] { 0x10 };
            byte[] readBuffer = new byte[2] { 0, 0 };

            device.WriteRead(writeBuffer, readBuffer);
            value = BitConverter.ToUInt16(readBuffer, 0);

            Debug.WriteLine($"Value {value}");

            Task.Delay(1000).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
         }
         while (value != 0);
      }
      Catch (Exception ex)
      {
         Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message);
      }
   }
}

GroveBaseHatRPIRegisterReader Debug output

'backgroundTaskHost.exe' (CoreCLR: CoreCLR_UWP_Domain): Loaded 'C:\Data\Users\DefaultAccount\AppData\Local\DevelopmentFiles\GroveBaseHatRPIRegisterReader-uwpVS.Debug_ARM.Bryn.Lewis\System.Diagnostics.Debug.dll'. Skipped loading symbols. Module is optimized and the debugger option 'Just My Code' is enabled.
Value 3685
Value 3685
Value 3688
Value 3681
Value 3681
Value 3688
Value 3688
Value 3683

The output changed when I adjusted the rotary angle sensor (0-4095) which confirmed I could reliably read the Analog input values.

The code for my test harness applications is available on github, the next step is to build a library for the Grove Base Hat for RaspberryPI

Arduino MKR1300 WAN Payload Addressing client

Last week a package arrived from SeeedStudio with some Arduino devices and Grove shields. With this gear I have built yet another client for my Azure IoT Hub and AdaFruit.IO  LoRa Field Gateways.

For my application I directly access the on-board Semtech SX127X chip by passing the Murata CMWX1ZZABZ functionality. To do this I (November 2018) I had to upgrade the device firmware using the Arduino updater.

Arduino MKR1300 WAN device with Grove Shield & patch antenna

The application is a modified version of my Arduino code with additional debugging support and payload formatting functionality.

/*
  Copyright ® 2018 November devMobile Software, All Rights Reserved

  THIS CODE AND INFORMATION IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY
  KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE
  IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
  PURPOSE.

  You can do what you want with this code, acknowledgment would be nice.

  http://www.devmobile.co.nz

*/
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <avr/dtostrf.h>
#include <LoRa.h>
#include <TH02_dev.h>

#define DEBUG
//#define DEBUG_TELEMETRY
//#define DEBUG_LORA

// LoRa field gateway configuration (these settings must match your field gateway)
const char FieldGatewayAddress[] = {"LoRaIoT1"};
const char DeviceAddress[] = {"MKR1300LoRa1"};
const float FieldGatewayFrequency =  915000000.0;
const byte FieldGatewaySyncWord = 0x12 ;

// Payload configuration
const int InterruptPin = LORA_IRQ_DUMB;
const int ChipSelectPin = 6;
const int ResetPin = 1;

// LoRa radio payload configuration
const byte SensorIdValueSeperator = ' ' ;
const byte SensorReadingSeperator = ',' ;
const int LoopSleepDelaySeconds = 60 ;

const byte PayloadSizeMaximum = 64 ;
byte payload[PayloadSizeMaximum];
byte payloadLength = 0 ;


void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
#ifdef DEBUG
  while (!Serial);
#endif
  Serial.println("Setup called");

  Serial.println("LoRa setup start");
  
  // override the default chip select and reset pins
  LoRa.setPins(InterruptPin, ChipSelectPin, ResetPin); 
  if (!LoRa.begin(FieldGatewayFrequency))
  {
    Serial.println("LoRa begin failed");
    while (true); // Drop into endless loop requiring restart
  }

  // Need to do this so field gateways pays attention to messsages from this device
  LoRa.enableCrc();
  LoRa.setSyncWord(FieldGatewaySyncWord);

#ifdef DEBUG_LORA
  LoRa.dumpRegisters(Serial);
#endif
  Serial.println("LoRa Setup done.");

  // Configure the Seeedstudio TH02 temperature & humidity sensor
  Serial.println("TH02 setup start");
  TH02.begin();
  delay(100);
  Serial.println("TH02 setup done");

  PayloadHeader((byte*)FieldGatewayAddress,strlen(FieldGatewayAddress), (byte*)DeviceAddress, strlen(DeviceAddress));

  Serial.println("Setup done");
  Serial.println();
}


void loop()
{
  float temperature ;
  float humidity ;

  Serial.println("Loop called");

  PayloadReset();

  // Read the temperature & humidity & battery voltage values then display nicely
  temperature = TH02.ReadTemperature();
  Serial.print("T:");
  Serial.print( temperature, 1 ) ;
  Serial.println( "C " ) ;

  PayloadAdd( "T", temperature, 1);

  humidity = TH02.ReadHumidity();
  Serial.print("H:");
  Serial.print( humidity, 0 ) ;
  Serial.println( "% " ) ;

  PayloadAdd( "H", humidity, 0) ;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.println();
  Serial.print( "RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength );
  Serial.println( " bytes" );
#endif

  LoRa.beginPacket();
  LoRa.write( payload, payloadLength );
  LoRa.endPacket();

  Serial.println("Loop done");
  Serial.println();
  delay(LoopSleepDelaySeconds * 1000l);
}


void PayloadHeader( byte *to, byte toAddressLength, byte *from, byte fromAddressLength)
{
  byte addressesLength = toAddressLength + fromAddressLength ;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.println("PayloadHeader- ");
  Serial.print( "To Address len:");
  Serial.print( toAddressLength );
  Serial.print( " From Address len:");
  Serial.print( fromAddressLength );
  Serial.print( " Addresses length:");
  Serial.print( addressesLength );
  Serial.println( );
#endif

  payloadLength = 0 ;

  // prepare the payload header with "To" Address length (top nibble) and "From" address length (bottom nibble)
  payload[payloadLength] = (toAddressLength << 4) | fromAddressLength ;
  payloadLength += 1;

  // Copy the "To" address into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], to, toAddressLength);
  payloadLength += toAddressLength ;

  // Copy the "From" into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], from, fromAddressLength);
  payloadLength += fromAddressLength ;
}


void PayloadAdd( char *sensorId, float value, byte decimalPlaces)
{
  byte sensorIdLength = strlen( sensorId ) ;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.println("PayloadAdd-float ");
  Serial.print( "SensorId:");
  Serial.print( sensorId );
  Serial.print( " sensorIdLen:");
  Serial.print( sensorIdLength );
  Serial.print( " Value:");
  Serial.print( value, decimalPlaces );
  Serial.print( " payloadLength:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength);
#endif

  memcpy( &payload[payloadLength], sensorId,  sensorIdLength) ;
  payloadLength += sensorIdLength ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorIdValueSeperator;
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( dtostrf(value, -1, decimalPlaces, (char *)&payload[payloadLength]));
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorReadingSeperator;
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  
#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.print( " payloadLength:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength);
  Serial.println( );
#endif
}


void PayloadAdd( char *sensorId, int value )
{
  byte sensorIdLength = strlen( sensorId ) ;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.println("PayloadAdd-int ");
  Serial.print( "SensorId:");
  Serial.print( sensorId );
  Serial.print( " sensorIdLen:");
  Serial.print( sensorIdLength );
  Serial.print( " Value:");
  Serial.print( value );
  Serial.print( " payloadLength:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength);
#endif  

  memcpy( &payload[payloadLength], sensorId,  sensorIdLength) ;
  payloadLength += sensorIdLength ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorIdValueSeperator;
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( itoa( value,(char *)&payload[payloadLength],10));
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorReadingSeperator;
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  
#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.print( " payloadLength:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength);
  Serial.println( );
#endif
}


void PayloadAdd( char *sensorId, unsigned int value )
{
  byte sensorIdLength = strlen( sensorId ) ;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.println("PayloadAdd-unsigned int ");
  Serial.print( "SensorId:");
  Serial.print( sensorId );
  Serial.print( " sensorIdLen:");
  Serial.print( sensorIdLength );
  Serial.print( " Value:");
  Serial.print( value );
  Serial.print( " payloadLength:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength);
#endif  

  memcpy( &payload[payloadLength], sensorId,  sensorIdLength) ;
  payloadLength += sensorIdLength ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorIdValueSeperator;
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( utoa( value,(char *)&payload[payloadLength],10));
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorReadingSeperator;
  payloadLength += 1 ;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.print( " payloadLength:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength);
  Serial.println( );
#endif
}


void PayloadReset()
{
  byte fromAddressLength = payload[0] & 0xf ;
  byte toAddressLength = payload[0] >> 4 ;
  byte addressesLength = toAddressLength + fromAddressLength ;

  payloadLength = addressesLength + 1;

#ifdef DEBUG_TELEMETRY
  Serial.println("PayloadReset- ");
  Serial.print( "To Address len:");
  Serial.print( toAddressLength );
  Serial.print( " From Address len:");
  Serial.print( fromAddressLength );
  Serial.print( " Addresses length:");
  Serial.print( addressesLength );
  Serial.println( );
#endif
}

After updating the firmware configuring the data to display in Azure IoT Central (or AdaFruit.IO) took minimal time.

Arduino MKR 1300 Data in Azure IoT Central

Bill of materials (Prices as at Nov 2018)

  • Arduino MKR WAN 1300 USD39.80
  • Arduino MKR Connection Carrier (Grove Compatible) USD22.80
  • Grove Temperature & Humidity Sensor USD11.50

So far the battery life is looking pretty good considering all I have done is used Delay to stop the loop method for 60 seconds.

Next steps are to see if I can retrieve a unique identifier from the Murata firmware and improve battery life by hibernating the processor etc.

Wisen Whisper Node – LoRa 915 MHz Payload Addressing Client

This is a demo Wizen Whisper NodeLoRa client (based on one of the examples from Arduino-LoRa) that uploads telemetry data to my Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry PI field gateway proof of concept(PoC).

The Wisen Bitbucket repository had sample code based on the RadioHead library which was useful for port numbers. This device family supports 433MHz, 868MHz & 915Mz modules. Wisen has other RFM69 based devices as well.

Bill of materials (Prices Sep 2018)

  • Wizen Whisper Node LoRa (433, 868 or 900 MHz) AUD27.90
  • Seeedstudio Temperature and Humidity Sensor Pro USD11.50
  • Seeedstudio 4 pin Male Jumper to Grove 4 pin Conversion Cable USD2.90

The code is pretty basic, it reads a value from the Seeedstudio temperature and humidity sensor, then packs the payload and sets the necessary RFM9X/SX127X LoRa module configuration. It has no power conservation, advanced wireless configuration etc.

I needed to use jumpers to connect my device up

WisenPatch20180924

WisenLoRa20180924

/*
  Adapted from LoRa Duplex communication with Sync Word

  Sends temperature & humidity data from Seeedstudio 

  https://www.seeedstudio.com/Grove-Temperature-Humidity-Sensor-High-Accuracy-Min-p-1921.html

  To my Windows 10 IoT Core RFM 9X library

  https://blog.devmobile.co.nz/2018/09/03/rfm9x-iotcore-payload-addressing/

*/
#include               // include libraries
#include
#include
const int csPin = 10;          // LoRa radio chip select
const int resetPin = 7;       // LoRa radio reset
const int irqPin = 2;         // change for your board; must be a hardware interrupt pin

// Field gateway configuration
const char FieldGatewayAddress[] = "LoRaIoT1";
const float FieldGatewayFrequency =  915000000.0;
const byte FieldGatewaySyncWord = 0x12 ;

// Payload configuration
const int PayloadSizeMaximum = 64 ;
byte payload[PayloadSizeMaximum] = "";
const byte SensorReadingSeperator = ',' ;

// Manual serial number configuration
const char DeviceId[] = {"Wisen01"};

const int LoopSleepDelaySeconds = 10 ;

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  //while (!Serial);

  Serial.println("LoRa Setup");

  // override the default CS, reset, and IRQ pins (optional)
  LoRa.setPins(csPin, resetPin, irqPin);// set CS, reset, IRQ pin

  if (!LoRa.begin(FieldGatewayFrequency))
  {
    Serial.println("LoRa init failed. Check your connections.");
    while (true);
  }

  // Need to do this so field gateways pays attention to messsages from this device
  LoRa.enableCrc();
  LoRa.setSyncWord(FieldGatewaySyncWord);  

  //LoRa.dumpRegisters(Serial);
  Serial.println("LoRa Setup done.");

  // Configure the Seeedstudio TH02 temperature & humidity sensor
  Serial.println("TH02 setup");
  TH02.begin();
  delay(100);
  Serial.println("TH02 Setup done");  

  Serial.println("Setup done");
}

void loop()
{
  int payloadLength = 0 ;
  float temperature ;
  float humidity ;

  Serial.println("Loop called");
  memset(payload, 0, sizeof(payload));

  // prepare the payload header with "To" Address length (top nibble) and "From" address length (bottom nibble)
  payload[0] = (strlen(FieldGatewayAddress) << 4) | strlen( DeviceId ) ;
  payloadLength += 1;

  // Copy the "To" address into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], FieldGatewayAddress, strlen(FieldGatewayAddress));
  payloadLength += strlen(FieldGatewayAddress) ;

  // Copy the "From" into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], DeviceId, strlen(DeviceId));
  payloadLength += strlen(DeviceId) ;

  // Read the temperature and humidity values then display nicely
  temperature = TH02.ReadTemperature();
  humidity = TH02.ReadHumidity();

  Serial.print("T:");
  Serial.print( temperature, 1 ) ;
  Serial.print( "C" ) ;

  Serial.print(" H:");
  Serial.print( humidity, 0 ) ;
  Serial.println( "%" ) ;

  // Copy the temperature into the payload
  payload[ payloadLength] = 't';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = ' ';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( dtostrf(temperature, -1, 1, (char*)&payload[payloadLength]));
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorReadingSeperator;
  payloadLength += sizeof(SensorReadingSeperator) ;

  // Copy the humidity into the payload
  payload[ payloadLength] = 'h';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = ' ';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( dtostrf(humidity, -1, 0, (char *)&payload[payloadLength]));  

  // display info about payload then send it (No ACK) with LoRa unlike nRF24L01
  Serial.print( "RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength );
  Serial.println( " bytes" );

  LoRa.beginPacket();
  LoRa.write( payload, payloadLength );
  LoRa.endPacket();      

  Serial.println("Loop done");

  delay(LoopSleepDelaySeconds * 1000l);
}

In the debug output window the messages from the device looked like this

20:38:30-RX From Wisen01 PacketSnr 10.0 Packet RSSI -48dBm RSSI -104dBm = 11 byte message "t 22.2,h 91"
Sensor Wisen01t Value 22.2
Sensor Wisen01h Value 91
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x14c0 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x788 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
20:38:40-RX From Wisen01 PacketSnr 9.8 Packet RSSI -48dBm RSSI -103dBm = 11 byte message "t 22.5,h 91"
Sensor Wisen01t Value 22.5
Sensor Wisen01h Value 91
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x1124 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x129c has exited with code 0 (0x0).
20:38:50-RX From Wisen01 PacketSnr 9.3 Packet RSSI -47dBm RSSI -96dBm = 11 byte message "t 22.7,h 91"
Sensor Wisen01t Value 22.7
Sensor Wisen01h Value 91
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x664 has exited with code 0 (0x0).

Then at my Azure IoT hub the data stream looked like this

WisenTalkLoRaAzureIoTHub

Adafruit Feather M0 RFM95 LoRa Radio Payload Addressing Client

This is a demo AdaFruit Feather Mo0 Radio with LoRa Radio Module client (based on one of the examples from Arduino-LoRa) that uploads telemetry data to my Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry PI field gateway proof of concept(PoC).

The Adafruit learn site had sample code based on the RadioHead library which was useful. This device supports 868MHz & 915Mz, there is are other Arduino 32u4 and 433MHz devices available.

Bill of materials (Prices Sep 2018)

  • Adafruit Feather M0 RFM95 LoRa Radio (433 or 900 MHz) USD34.95
  • Seeedstudio Temperature and Humidity Sensor Pro USD11.50
  • Seeedstudio 4 pin Male Jumper to Grove 4 pin Conversion Cable USD2.90

The code is pretty basic, it reads a value from the Seeedstudio temperature and humidity sensor, then packs the payload and sets the necessary RFM9X/SX127X LoRa module configuration, has no power conservation, advanced wireless configuration etc. I had to add an extra include from the dstrtof function

AdaFruitM0Feather

/*
  Adapted from LoRa Duplex communication with Sync Word

  Sends temperature & humidity data from Seeedstudio 

  https://www.seeedstudio.com/Grove-Temperature-Humidity-Sensor-High-Accuracy-Min-p-1921.html

  To my Windows 10 IoT Core RFM 9X library

  https://blog.devmobile.co.nz/2018/09/03/rfm9x-iotcore-payload-addressing/

*/
#include
#include
#include
#include
const int csPin = 8;          // LoRa radio chip select
const int resetPin = 4;       // LoRa radio reset
const int irqPin = 3;         // change for your board; must be a hardware interrupt pin

// Field gateway configuration
const char FieldGatewayAddress[] = "LoRaIoT1";
const float FieldGatewayFrequency =  915000000.0;
const byte FieldGatewaySyncWord = 0x12 ;

// Payload configuration
const int PayloadSizeMaximum = 64 ;
byte payload[PayloadSizeMaximum] = "";
const byte SensorReadingSeperator = ',' ;

// Manual serial number configuration
const char DeviceId[] = {"AdafruitM0"};

const int LoopSleepDelaySeconds = 10 ;

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  //while (!Serial);

  Serial.println("LoRa Setup");

  // override the default CS, reset, and IRQ pins (optional)
  LoRa.setPins(csPin, resetPin, irqPin);// set CS, reset, IRQ pin

  if (!LoRa.begin(FieldGatewayFrequency))
  {
    Serial.println("LoRa init failed. Check your connections.");
    while (true);
  }

  // Need to do this so field gateways pays attention to messages from this device
  LoRa.enableCrc();
  LoRa.setSyncWord(FieldGatewaySyncWord);  

  //LoRa.dumpRegisters(Serial);
  Serial.println("LoRa Setup done.");

  // Configure the Seeedstudio TH02 temperature & humidity sensor
  Serial.println("TH02 setup");
  TH02.begin();
  delay(100);
  Serial.println("TH02 Setup done");  

  Serial.println("Setup done");
}

void loop()
{
  int payloadLength = 0 ;
  float temperature ;
  float humidity ;

  Serial.println("Loop called");
  memset(payload, 0, sizeof(payload));

  // prepare the payload header with "To" Address length (top nibble) and "From" address length (bottom nibble)
  payload[0] = (strlen(FieldGatewayAddress) << 4) | strlen( DeviceId ) ;
  payloadLength += 1;

  // Copy the "To" address into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], FieldGatewayAddress, strlen(FieldGatewayAddress));
  payloadLength += strlen(FieldGatewayAddress) ;

  // Copy the "From" into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], DeviceId, strlen(DeviceId));
  payloadLength += strlen(DeviceId) ;

  // Read the temperature and humidity values then display nicely
  temperature = TH02.ReadTemperature();
  humidity = TH02.ReadHumidity();

  Serial.print("T:");
  Serial.print( temperature, 1 ) ;
  Serial.print( "C" ) ;

  Serial.print(" H:");
  Serial.print( humidity, 0 ) ;
  Serial.println( "%" ) ;

  // Copy the temperature into the payload
  payload[ payloadLength] = 't';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = ' ';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( dtostrf(temperature, -1, 1, (char*)&payload[payloadLength]));
  payload[ payloadLength] = SensorReadingSeperator;
  payloadLength += sizeof(SensorReadingSeperator) ;

  // Copy the humidity into the payload
  payload[ payloadLength] = 'h';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = ' ';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( dtostrf(humidity, -1, 0, (char *)&payload[payloadLength]));  

  // display info about payload then send it (No ACK) with LoRa unlike nRF24L01
  Serial.print( "RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength );
  Serial.println( " bytes" );

  LoRa.beginPacket();
  LoRa.write( payload, payloadLength );
  LoRa.endPacket();      

  Serial.println("Loop done");

  delay(LoopSleepDelaySeconds * 1000l);
}

In the Arduino debug monitor the messages from the device looked like this

Loop done
Loop called
T:17.5C H:94%
RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:30 bytes
Loop done
Loop called
T:17.5C H:95%
RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:30 bytes
Loop done
Loop called
T:17.6C H:95%
RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:30 bytes
Loop done

In the debug output window the messages from the device looked like this

The thread 0xf9c has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x8ac has exited with code 0 (0x0).
09:53:53-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 10.3 Packet RSSI -51dBm RSSI -103dBm = 11 byte message "t 17.8,h 93"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 17.8
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 93
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x704 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0xad4 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
09:54:03-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.8 Packet RSSI -52dBm RSSI -101dBm = 11 byte message "t 17.8,h 93"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 17.8
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 93
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x1084 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0xa2c has exited with code 0 (0x0).
09:54:14-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.8 Packet RSSI -54dBm RSSI -102dBm = 11 byte message "t 17.7,h 93"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 17.7
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 93
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x1720 has exited with code 0 (0x0).

10:00:06-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.3 Packet RSSI -52dBm RSSI -100dBm = 12 byte message "t 184.0,h 91"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 184.0
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 91
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x15d4 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x15f4 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
10:00:19-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 10.0 Packet RSSI -48dBm RSSI -102dBm = 12 byte message "t 180.9,h 94"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 180.9
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 94
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0xabc has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x2e4 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
10:00:29-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.8 Packet RSSI -49dBm RSSI -102dBm = 12 byte message "t -50.0,h 94"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value -50.0
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 94
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x950 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x145c has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x176c has exited with code 0 (0x0).
10:00:39-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.5 Packet RSSI -50dBm RSSI -102dBm = 11 byte message "t 17.5,h 94"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 17.5
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 94
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x165c has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x6e8 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
10:00:49-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.8 Packet RSSI -59dBm RSSI -100dBm = 11 byte message "t 17.5,h 95"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 17.5
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 95
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x1334 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x14d0 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
10:00:59-RX From AdafruitM0 PacketSnr 9.5 Packet RSSI -66dBm RSSI -102dBm = 11 byte message "t 17.6,h 95"
Sensor AdafruitM0t Value 17.6
Sensor AdafruitM0h Value 95
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish

Then at my Azure IoT hub the data stream looked like this
AdaFruitM0LoRaFeatherIoTHub

To reduce power consumption I would disconnect/remove the light emitting diode(LED)

Elecrow 32u4 with Lora RFM95 IOT Board Payload Addressing Client

This is a demo Elecrow 32u4 with Lora RFM95 IOT Board-868MHz/915MHz client (based on one of the examples from Arduino-LoRa) that uploads telemetry data to my Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry PI field gateway proof of concept(PoC).

The elecrow wiki had sample code based on the RadioHead library which was useful.

Bill of materials (Prices Sep 2018)

  • 32u4 with Lora RFM95 IOT Board-868MHz/915MHz USD22.50
  • Seeedstudio LightLevel Sensor USD2.90
  • Elecrow Crowtail to Grove 4 pin Conversion Cable USD1.00

The code is pretty basic, it reads a value from the light sensor, scales it, then packs the payload and sets the necessary RFM9X/SX127X LoRa module configuration, has no power conservation, advanced wireless configuration etc.

Elecrow32u4LoRa

/*
  Adapted from LoRa Duplex communication with Sync Word

  Sends Light data from Seeedstudio 

   https://www.seeedstudio.com/Grove-Light-Sensor-v1-2-p-2727.html

  To my Windows 10 IoT Core RFM 9X library

  https://blog.devmobile.co.nz/2018/09/03/rfm9x-iotcore-payload-addressing/

*/
#include               // include libraries
#include
const int csPin = 10;          // LoRa radio chip select
const int resetPin = 9;       // LoRa radio reset
const int irqPin = 2;         // change for your board; must be a hardware interrupt pin

// Field gateway configuration
const char FieldGatewayAddress[] = "LoRaIoT1";
const float FieldGatewayFrequency =  915000000.0;
const byte FieldGatewaySyncWord = 0x12 ;

// Payload configuration
const int PayloadSizeMaximum = 64 ;
byte payload[PayloadSizeMaximum] = "";
const byte SensorReadingSeperator = ',' ;

// Manual serial number configuration
const char DeviceId[] = {"Elecrow32u4"};

const int analogInPin = A0;
const int LoopSleepDelaySeconds = 60 ;

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);

  Serial.println("LoRa Setup");

  // override the default CS, reset, and IRQ pins (optional)
  LoRa.setPins(csPin, resetPin, irqPin);// set CS, reset, IRQ pin

  if (!LoRa.begin(FieldGatewayFrequency))
  {
    Serial.println("LoRa init failed. Check your connections.");
    while (true);
  }

  // Need to do this so field gateways pays attention to messages from this device
  LoRa.enableCrc();
  LoRa.setSyncWord(FieldGatewaySyncWord);  

  LoRa.dumpRegisters(Serial);
  Serial.println("LoRa Setup done.");

  Serial.println("Setup done");
}

void loop()
{
  int payloadLength = 0 ;
  int sensorValue = 0;
  int outputValue = 0; 

  Serial.println("Loop called");
  memset(payload, 0, sizeof(payload));

  // Scale the sensor value to a %
  sensorValue = analogRead(analogInPin);
  outputValue = map(sensorValue, 0, 1023, 0, 100);  

  // prepare the payload header with "To" Address length (top nibble) and "From" address length (bottom nibble)
  payload[0] = (strlen(FieldGatewayAddress) << 4) | strlen( DeviceId ) ;
  payloadLength += 1;

  // Copy the "To" address into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], FieldGatewayAddress, strlen(FieldGatewayAddress));
  payloadLength += strlen(FieldGatewayAddress) ;

  // Copy the "From" into payload
  memcpy(&payload[payloadLength], DeviceId, strlen(DeviceId));
  payloadLength += strlen(DeviceId) ;

  Serial.println("Loop called 5");

  Serial.print("L:");
  Serial.print( outputValue ) ;
  Serial.println( "%" ) ;

  // Copy the temperature into the payload
  payload[ payloadLength] = 'l';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payload[ payloadLength] = ' ';
  payloadLength += 1 ;
  payloadLength += strlen( itoa(outputValue, &payload[payloadLength],10 ));  

  // display info about payload then send it (No ACK) with LoRa unlike nRF24L01
  Serial.print( "RFM9X/SX127X Payload length:");
  Serial.print( payloadLength );
  Serial.println( " bytes" );

  LoRa.beginPacket();
  LoRa.write( payload, payloadLength );
  LoRa.endPacket();      

  Serial.println("Loop done");

  delay(LoopSleepDelaySeconds * 1000l);
}

In the debug output window the messages from the device looked like this

14:06:38-RX From Elecrow32u4 PacketSnr 9.8 Packet RSSI -88dBm RSSI -110dBm = 4 byte message "l 85"
Sensor Elecrow32u4l Value 85
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x930 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0xb74 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x3c8 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x984 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
14:07:01-RX From IoTMCU915 PacketSnr 9.3 Packet RSSI -87dBm RSSI -110dBm = 12 byte message "t 13.7,h 113"
Sensor IoTMCU915t Value 13.7
Sensor IoTMCU915h Value 113
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync start
AzureIoTHubClient SendEventAsync finish
The thread 0x6e8 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x7b4 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0xe9c has exited with code 0 (0x0).

My battery is a bit of an overkill and to reduce power consumption I would disconnect/remove the light emitting diode(LED)