iwanders/plainRFM69 revisited

After problems with interleaved interrupt handling in my Windows 10 IoT Core client I figured the AutoMode used by the plainRFM69 library might be worth investigation. My first Arduino client was based on the plainRFM69 library but had Interoperability issues.

For this attempt I also started with the minimal sample and modified the code to send and receive text messages.

/*
    Copyright (c) 2014, Ivor Wanders, Bryn Lewis 2019
    MIT License, see the LICENSE.md file in the root folder.
*/

#include <SPI.h>
#include <plainRFM69.h>

// slave select pin.
#define SLAVE_SELECT_PIN 10

// connected to the reset pin of the RFM69.
#define RESET_PIN 9

// tie this pin down on the receiver.
#define SENDER_DETECT_PIN A0

const uint8_t tx_buffer[] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTURWXYZ1234567890";
//const uint8_t tx_buffer[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890";
uint8_t rx_buffer[sizeof(tx_buffer)] = "";

plainRFM69 rfm = plainRFM69(SLAVE_SELECT_PIN);


void sender() {

  uint32_t start_time = millis();

  uint32_t counter = 1; // the counter which we are going to send.

  while (true) {
    rfm.poll(); // run poll as often as possible.

    if (!rfm.canSend()) {
      continue; // sending is not possible, already sending.
    }

    if ((millis() - start_time) > 1000) { // every 500 ms.
      start_time = millis();

      // be a little bit verbose.
      Serial.print("Send:"); Serial.println(counter);

      // send the number of bytes equal to that set with setPacketLength.
      // read those bytes from memory where counter starts.
      rfm.sendVariable(tx_buffer, counter);

      counter++; // increase the counter.

      if ( counter > strlen(tx_buffer))
      {
        counter = 1;
      }
    }
  }
}

void receiver() {
  uint32_t counter = 0; // to count the messages.

  while (true) {

    rfm.poll(); // poll as often as possible.

    while (rfm.available())
    {
      uint8_t len = rfm.read(rx_buffer); // read the packet into the new_counter.

      // print verbose output.
      Serial.print("Packet Len:");
      Serial.print( len );
      Serial.print(" : ");
      Serial.println((char*)rx_buffer);
    }
  }
}

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  SPI.begin();

  bareRFM69::reset(RESET_PIN); // sent the RFM69 a hard-reset.

  //rfm.setRecommended(); // set recommended paramters in RFM69.
  rfm.setPacketType(true, false); // set the used packet type.

  rfm.setBufferSize(2);   // set the internal buffer size.
  rfm.setPacketLength(sizeof(rx_buffer)); // set the packet length.

  rfm.setFrequency((uint32_t)909560000); // set the frequency.

  rfm.setLNA(RFM69_LNA_IMP_200OHM, RFM69_LNA_GAIN_AGC_LOOP);

  // p71, 3 preamble bytes.
  rfm.setPreambleSize(16);

  // p71, 4 bytes sync of 0x01, only start listening when sync is matched.
  //uint8_t syncthing[] = {0xaa, 0x2d, 0xd4};
  uint8_t syncthing[] = {0xd4, 0x2d, 0xaa};
  rfm.setSyncConfig(true, false, sizeof(syncthing), 0);
  rfm.setSyncValue(&syncthing, sizeof(syncthing));

  rfm.dumpRegisters(Serial);

  // baudrate is default, 4800 bps now.

  rfm.receive();
  // set it to receiving mode.

  pinMode(SENDER_DETECT_PIN, INPUT_PULLUP);
  delay(5);
}

void loop() {
  if (digitalRead(SENDER_DETECT_PIN) == LOW) {
    Serial.println("Going Receiver!");
    receiver();
    // this function never returns and contains an infinite loop.
  } else {
    Serial.println("Going sender!");
    sender();
    // idem.
  }
}

I took the list register values and loaded them into a Excel spreadsheet alongside the values from my Windows 10 IoT Core application

17:35:03.044 -> 0x0: 0x0
17:35:03.078 -> 0x1: 0x4
17:35:03.078 -> 0x2: 0x0
17:35:03.078 -> 0x3: 0x1A
17:35:03.112 -> 0x4: 0xB
17:35:03.112 -> 0x5: 0x0
17:35:03.112 -> 0x6: 0x52
17:35:03.146 -> 0x7: 0xE3
17:35:03.146 -> 0x8: 0x63
17:35:03.146 -> 0x9: 0xD7
17:35:03.180 -> 0xA: 0x41
17:35:03.180 -> 0xB: 0x40
17:35:03.180 -> 0xC: 0x2
17:35:03.215 -> 0xD: 0x92
17:35:03.215 -> 0xE: 0xF5
17:35:03.249 -> 0xF: 0x20
17:35:03.249 -> 0x10: 0x24
17:35:03.249 -> 0x11: 0x9F
17:35:03.282 -> 0x12: 0x9
17:35:03.282 -> 0x13: 0x1A
17:35:03.282 -> 0x14: 0x40
17:35:03.317 -> 0x15: 0xB0
17:35:03.317 -> 0x16: 0x7B
17:35:03.317 -> 0x17: 0x9B
17:35:03.317 -> 0x18: 0x88
17:35:03.351 -> 0x19: 0x86
17:35:03.351 -> 0x1A: 0x8A
17:35:03.384 -> 0x1B: 0x40
17:35:03.384 -> 0x1C: 0x80
17:35:03.384 -> 0x1D: 0x6
17:35:03.418 -> 0x1E: 0x10
17:35:03.418 -> 0x1F: 0x0
17:35:03.452 -> 0x20: 0x0
17:35:03.452 -> 0x21: 0x0
17:35:03.452 -> 0x22: 0x0
17:35:03.487 -> 0x23: 0x2
17:35:03.487 -> 0x24: 0xFF
17:35:03.487 -> 0x25: 0x0
17:35:03.521 -> 0x26: 0x5
17:35:03.521 -> 0x27: 0x80
17:35:03.521 -> 0x28: 0x0
17:35:03.556 -> 0x29: 0xFF
17:35:03.556 -> 0x2A: 0x0
17:35:03.556 -> 0x2B: 0x0
17:35:03.556 -> 0x2C: 0x0
17:35:03.590 -> 0x2D: 0x10
17:35:03.590 -> 0x2E: 0x90
17:35:03.624 -> 0x2F: 0xAA
17:35:03.624 -> 0x30: 0x2D
17:35:03.624 -> 0x31: 0xD4
17:35:03.659 -> 0x32: 0x0
17:35:03.659 -> 0x33: 0x0
17:35:03.659 -> 0x34: 0x0
17:35:03.693 -> 0x35: 0x0
17:35:03.693 -> 0x36: 0x0
17:35:03.728 -> 0x37: 0xD0
17:35:03.728 -> 0x38: 0x25
17:35:03.728 -> 0x39: 0x0
17:35:03.761 -> 0x3A: 0x0
17:35:03.761 -> 0x3B: 0x0
17:35:03.761 -> 0x3C: 0x1
17:35:03.795 -> 0x3D: 0x0
17:35:03.795 -> Going sender!
17:35:04.725 -> Send:1

Arduino RFM69HCW Client in receive mode

First thing I noticed was the order of the three sync byes (Registers 0x2F, 0x30, 0x31) was reversed. I then modified the run method in the Windows 10 code so the registers settings on both devices matched. (I removed the PlainRFM69 SetRecommended call so as many of the default options as possible were used).

public void Run(IBackgroundTaskInstance taskInstance)
{
	byte[] syncValues = { 0xAA, 0x2D, 0xD4 };
	byte[] aesKeyValues = { 0x0, 0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, 0x08, 0x09, 0x0A, 0x0B, 0x0C, 0x0D, 0X0E, 0X0F };

	try
	{
		rfm69Device.Initialise(Rfm69HcwDevice.RegOpModeMode.StandBy
										,frequency: 909560000.0 
										,dio0Mapping: Rfm69HcwDevice.Dio0Mapping.ReceiveCrcOk
										,preambleSize: 16												
										,syncValues: syncValues
										,packetFormat: Rfm69HcwDevice.RegPacketConfig1PacketFormat.VariableLength
										,packetDcFree: Rfm69HcwDevice.RegPacketConfig1DcFree.Whitening
										,autoRestartRx: false
										//,addressNode: 0x22
										//,addressbroadcast: 0x99
										//,aesKey: aesKeyValues
										);

		rfm69Device.OnReceive += Rfm69Device_OnReceive;
		rfm69Device.OnTransmit += Rfm69Device_OnTransmit;

		rfm69Device.RegisterDump();
		rfm69Device.SetMode(Rfm69HcwDevice.RegOpModeMode.Receive);


		while (true)
		{
			if (true)
			{
				string message = $"hello world {Environment.MachineName} {DateTime.Now:hh-mm-ss}";

				byte[] messageBuffer = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(message);

				Debug.WriteLine("{0:HH:mm:ss.fff} Send-{1}", DateTime.Now, message);
				//rfm69Device.SendMessage( 0x11, messageBuffer);
				rfm69Device.SendMessage(messageBuffer);

				Debug.WriteLine("{0:HH:mm:ss.fff} Send-Done", DateTime.Now);

				Task.Delay(5000).Wait();
			}
			else
			{
				Debug.Write(".");
				Task.Delay(1000).Wait();
			}
		}
	}
	catch (Exception ex)
	{
		Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message);
	}
}

I also found an error with the declaration of the RegPacketConfig1DcFree enumeration (Whitening = 0b0100000 vs. Whitening = 0b01000000) which wouldn’t have helped.

public enum RegPacketConfig1DcFree : byte
{
	None = 0b00000000,
	Manchester = 0b00100000,
	Whitening = 0b01000000,
	Reserved = 0b01100000,
}
const RegPacketConfig1DcFree RegPacketConfig1DcFreeDefault = RegPacketConfig1DcFree.None;

I could then reliably sent messages to and receive messages from my Arduino Nano Radio Shield RFM69/95 device

Register 0x4c - Value 0X00 - Bits 00000000
Register 0x4d - Value 0X00 - Bits 00000000
...
17:55:53.559 Received 1 byte message A CRC Ok True
.17:55:54.441 Received 2 byte message AB CRC Ok True
.17:55:55.444 Received 3 byte message ABC CRC Ok True
.17:55:56.447 Received 4 byte message ABCD CRC Ok True
.17:55:57.449 Received 5 byte message ABCDE CRC Ok True
.17:55:58.453 Received 6 byte message ABCDEF CRC Ok True
The thread 0x578 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
.17:55:59.622 Received 7 byte message ABCDEFG CRC Ok True
.17:56:00.457 Received 8 byte message ABCDEFGH CRC Ok True
.17:56:01.460 Received 9 byte message ABCDEFGHI CRC Ok True
.17:56:02.463 Received 10 byte message ABCDEFGHIJ CRC Ok True
..17:56:03.955 Received 11 byte message ABCDEFGHIJK CRC Ok True
17:56:04.583 Received 12 byte message ABCDEFGHIJKL CRC Ok True

I did some investigation into that the plainRMF69 code and found the ReadMultiple and WriteMuliple methods reverse the byte order

void bareRFM69::writeMultiple(uint8_t reg, void* data, uint8_t len){
    SPI.beginTransaction(SPISettings(10000000, MSBFIRST, SPI_MODE0));  // gain control of SPI bus
    this->chipSelect(true); // assert chip select
    SPI.transfer(RFM69_WRITE_REG_MASK | (reg & RFM69_READ_REG_MASK)); 
    uint8_t* r = reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(data);
    for (uint8_t i=0; i < len ; i++){
        SPI.transfer(r[len - i - 1]);
    }
    this->chipSelect(false);// deassert chip select
    SPI.endTransaction();    // release the SPI bus
}

void bareRFM69::readMultiple(uint8_t reg, void* data, uint8_t len){
    SPI.beginTransaction(SPISettings(10000000, MSBFIRST, SPI_MODE0));  // gain control of SPI bus
    this->chipSelect(true); // assert chip select
    
    SPI.transfer((reg % RFM69_READ_REG_MASK));
    uint8_t* r = reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(data);
    for (uint8_t i=0; i < len ; i++){
        r[len - i - 1] = SPI.transfer(0);
    }
    this->chipSelect(false);// deassert chip select
    SPI.endTransaction();    // release the SPI bus
}

I won’t be able to use interrupt AutoMode clients with the EasySensors shields as the DIO2 pin is not connected but on the AdaFruit RFM69HCW Radio Bonnet 433MHz or 915MHz it is connected to GPIO24.

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