Azure IoT Central Connectivity Part3

Request Commands

I have built a couple of proof of Concept(PoC) applications to explore the Basic Telemetry and Basic Command functionality of Azure IoT Central. This blog post is about queued and non queued Cloud to Device(C2D) Commands with request parameters.

I initially created an Azure IoT Central Device Template with command and telemetry device capabilities.

“Collapsed” Command Request template
Command Request Template digital commands

I tried typed request and object based parameters to explorer how an integration with The Things Network(TTN)/The Things Industries(TTI) using the Message Queue Telemetry Transport(MQTT) interface could work.

Object parameter schema designer

With object based parameters the request JSON could contain more than one value though the validation of user provided information didn’t appear to be as robust.

Object parameter schema definition

I “migrated” my third preconfigured device to the CommandRequest template to see how the commands with Request parameters interacted with my PoC application.

After “migrating” my device I went back and created a Template view so I could visualise the simulated telemetry from my PoC application and provide a way to initiate commands (Didn’t really need four command tiles as they all open the Device commands form).

CommandRequest device template default view

From the Device Commands form I could send commands and a queued commands which had analog or digital parameters.

Device Three Command Tab

When I initiated an Analog non-queued command the default method handler was invoked with the name of the command capability (Analog_Output_1) as the method name and the payload contained a JSON representation of the request values(s). With a typed parameter a string representation of the value was in the message payload. With a typed parameter a string representation of the value was in the message payload rather than JSON.

Console application displaying Analog request and Analog Request queued commands

When I initiated an Analog queued command the message handler was invoked with the name of the command capability (Analog_Output_2) in a message property called “method-name” and the payload contained a JSON representation of the request value(s). With a typed parameter a string representation of the value was in the message payload rather than JSON.

When I initiated a Digital non-queued command the default method handler was invoked with the name of the command capability (Digital_Output_1) as the method name and the payload contained a JSON representation of the request values(s). With a typed parameter a string representation of the value was in the message payload rather than JSON.

Console application displaying Digital request and Digital Request queued commands

When I initiated a Digital queued command the message handler was invoked with the name of the command capability(Digital_Output_2) in a message property called “method-name” and the payload contained a JSON representation of the request value(s). With a typed parameter a string representation of the value was in the message payload rather than JSON.

The validation of user input wasn’t as robust as I expected, with problems selecting checkboxes with a mouse when there were several Boolean fields. I often had to click on a nearby input field and use the TAB button to navigate to the desired checkbox. I also had problems with ISO 8601 format date validation as the built in Date Picker returned a month, day, year date which was not editable and wouldn’t pass validation.

The next logical step would be to look at commands with a Response parameter but as the MQTT interface is The Things Network(TTN) and The Things Industries(TTI) is asynchronous and devices reporting every 5 minutes to a couple of times a day there could be a significant delay between sending a message and receiving an optional delivery confirmation or response.

2 thoughts on “Azure IoT Central Connectivity Part3

  1. Pingback: Azure IoT Central Connectivity Part4 | devMobile's blog

  2. Pingback: TTI V3 Connector Azure IoT Central Cloud to Device(C2D) | devMobile's blog

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